All Posts Tagged With: "The Conservative Reader"

The Pinhead Factor

An anonymous writer at The Real Sporer Tuesday night made an interesting observation that I think we should not only understand but build an action plan upon.

At the end of the second Presidential Debate there were a few trailing comments at Ted’s site (including one from yours truly), and the final one at about 12:20 AM stated:

I feel like Dorothy in the Wizard of Oz. Instead of repeating “there’s no place like home, there’s no place like home”
I find myself repeating “Maybe democrats aren’t so bad, maybe democrats aren’t so bad”. I know it’s just a psychological coping mechanism. BHO is a damn good debater. He doesn’t have much substance but unfortunately we live with at least 50.1% pinheads. I am concerned.


New And Improved

Welcome to the new look for The Conservative Reader!
We’ve implemented a new WordPress theme to help provide a cleaner and easier to read look.
Although we’ll be tweaking the site over the next several weeks, please observe the following changes:

  • A new Featured Post box at the top of the page, as part of a tabbed box. We will have our most recent feature item in this space.
  • The tabbed box will allow us to make access to key content more easily available in the future. Look for new tabs when you visit.
  • The top headlines from several major news sites are found near the upper right part of the screen.
  • Easier search and access to Archives and Categories.
  • Other content in the far

So, Are We Paying Attention?

I’m hoping that the fact you have come to this web site means that you care more about government than the average person.  If you care about government, how we do government, and who is doing the work of government on our behalf, then this article is for you.

I’ve alluded to this before, and I want adequately convey, that a knowledgeable, thoughtful electorate will help ensure that the best people represent us, and will be able to hold politicians accountable.

“Knowledgeable” means not just watching the 15 second sound-bites, but watching debates, reading up on candidates’ positions, and looking for independent resources that assess candidates’ records.  It also means seeking to understand the issues, how they impact Americans, what the history and background are …


Oil Is Not Typical Supply and Demand

More like “Over A Barrel”.  But now that we’ve taken the first step toward off-shore drilling in the US, the impact is already seen.  Because it’s really not about supply-side economics as much as perceived supply-side economics.  And now the perception is that the supply won’t be in a strangle hold any longer.

President Bush takes the first step, dropping the Presidential Ban on domestic drilling.  The pundits say “It doesn’t matter what Bush does, it will take Congress dropping their ban and approval by affected states to open up the drilling, and then 5 to 10 years before there is any impact on oil prices.”.

The current price of oil, as we should all know by now, has nothing to do with the …


What If They’re Wrong?

I am surprised I didn’t see more blogs lit up over this today (Allahpundit over at Hot Air did hit on it,Justice In Question though).

The Supreme Court was wrong.

That is, Anthony Kennedy, who wrote the majority opinion in Kennedy v. Louisiana, was wrong.  If you recall, Kennedy wrote in his opinion (discussed here last week) that

Thirty-seven jurisdictions—36 States plus the Federal Government— currently impose capital punishment, but only six States authorize it for child rape.

Kennedy then used this fact to establish that Congress’ lack of action to enact capital punishment for child rape reflected the country’s growing desire to treat child rapists more kindly.  I’m still gagging over that one.

In Wednesday’s New York Times, we find that Kennedy, along with …


A Brief History of Thatcherism

Margaret ThatcherThis month’s Imprimis features a speech by John O’Sullivan, executive editor of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty and one-time special advisor to former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.

O’Sullivan’s speech provides a valuable lesson in the history of Thatcher’s leadership and the power of privatized industry in building an entrepreneurial society, and how this can stimulate a stagnated socialist economy.

May we never reach the depth that Britain did.

O’Sullivan’s speech was given at the dedication of the first statue of Margaret Thatcher to be placed in the United States, which was at Hillsdale College (the home of Imprimis).

He covers a great deal regarding the Cold War, and Thatcher’s role working with Reagan, Helmut Schmidt, and others to build a stronger missile presence in Western …


We All Need A Little Catch Up

I’m still getting caught up on things political. Like, Laura Ingraham is now doing a weekly show on Fox called “Just In”. I have yet to see it, but if you’re a fan of her radio program, I’m sure you’ll enjoy it.

Speaking of Laura’s radio show, evidently she’s in the middle of some kind of contract thing with her network. There’s a lot of squawking here and there (I got an email saying she’s being shut down). However, Laura says everything is okay, and she’ll be back on the radio soon enough. Sit tight folks.

The Associated Press has been nice enough to drag a number of bloggers through the mud… so far, The Conservative Reader has kept below the radar… it helps that …


It Doesn’t Take Much to Fool People

President Bush and Senator John McCain are both now promoting off-shore domestic drilling.  Hallelujah.  It took them long enough.

But it is, amazingly, going to yet be an uphill battle.  As long as Democrats continue to stand on weak, worthless principles, like “anywhere buy my backyard”, we’re going to have to fight for the things that make sense.

I’m not advocating we put ourselves into a position to cause the kinds of oil disasters that drove us away from drilling off the coasts of California and Florida… but we should have the technology now to provide the safeguards needed to prevent that.

However, in an area that has no people, no tourists, and no real value to people, Bush and McCain continue to oppose …


Congressional Conservationists Corraling Resources

Not that anyone should be shocked, but definitely frustrated, but today’s Washington Post provides some insight to the plans of Congress with regard to converting more and more land over to federal protection control.  You know what’s scary?  If this had been the approach Congress took when Thomas Jefferson was president, we’d still be all stuck on the east coast, the western 1/3 of the country would be part of Mexico, and everything from Ohio to the Rockies would still be under Indian control (well, maybe not) and undeveloped.  Oh, and we’d still be using outhouses.

The thinking is, Congress may set aside as many as 2 million additional acres in this year.

Wilderness areas, which have the strictest level of federal protection, account for


What Conservatives Stand For

Thursday morning’s Wall Street Journal featured an opinion piece from Karl Rove titled “The GOP Must Stand for Something“.  The piece is well focused on the most critical battleground we face this year: Congressional seats.

In the midst of watching the melee within the Democratic Party, the scant attacks by the MSM against McCain, and the vain attempts by Ron Paul and others to disrupt the Presidential Election process, largely unfocused are we yet on the 35 Senate seats (23 currently held by Republicans) and the length and width of the House of Representatives whom we will be voting for this November.

My angst over the lack of attention to the branch of government that actually makes law in this country grows each …


    Log in