All Posts Tagged With: "National Debt"

Massive Regulation Hurts Small Business

Joshua B. Lantz, True CapitalismJosh Lantz joins us today as a new writer.  He also writes for True Capitalism. – Ed.

 

A study done by the Small Business Administration (SBA) said that in 2010 the annual cost of Federal regulations was $1.75 trillion.[1] Our annual GDP is over $15 trillion, meaning the cost of these regulations amounts to about 11.5% of GDP.[2] That’s a lot of money. Think of the impact on our struggling economy if we were able to cut those costs in half.

Why do regulations have a cost?

When government creates a rule (regulation), they often have to hire more public sector workers to enforce it. This expands government and pulls more people out of the private sector where goods and services are produced.…


Default is Inevitable, Part II

Talking points are truly amazing things. They capture the essence of the obsessions of political operatives. The political news has recently been dominated by the talking points surrounding the debt ceiling debate, with the main terms of choice being the assorted variants of “apocalypse.”

First of all, failing to raise the debt ceiling would not automatically lead to a default on the national debt. The federal government would continue to collect revenue, and could use that revenue to pay debt obligations as they fall due, or in other words, pay the coupon interest on time. This would involve deep cuts to everything else, and if you are a professional politician that is synonymous with impossible, so there is an assumption that default would be the …


On National Debt, Default is Inevitable

Much attention has been focused on the size of the national debt as a whole; roughly $14.4 trillion. That number is astonishing, but the sheer size of the debt actually hides the true horror which is in store for the economy and future generations.

The debt has many component categories, the largest of which is called Marketable Debt. That means the portion of the debt that was issued in treasury securities that can be sold in the secondary bond market, and it is around $9.2 trillion. The rest is Non-marketable, and held mainly by the Social Security Administration through bonds that cannot be sold.

The Marketable Debt also has its own sub-components, based on the type of security that was sold to incur the debt …


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