All Posts Tagged With: "Student loans"

Think College is Critical? Bureau of Labor Statistics Projections Suggest Otherwise

The Bureau of Labor Statistics has on its site information on the 30 occupations where the most jobs are expected to be added between 2010 and 2020. (See Table 6. The 30 occupations with the largest projected employment growth, 2010-20, or click here to see the table.)

The BLS projects that these 30 occupations will add approximately 9.3 million new positions by 2020. These positions would be completely new additions to the existing workforce and not dependent on attrition of the current workers.

They are listed in order of the number of new posts expected, with the top spot being registered nurse, which is no surprise, with an expected growth of almost 712,000 new positions. At the bottom of the list is medical assistant, with …


Student Loans, Debt Crisis and Bondage

In the medieval era there was a rather odd ceremony; when a member of the lower social castes found themselves in dire straights, they turned to the landowning nobility. In exchange for land to work, the noble demanded a portion of the produce, availability for certain laborious tasks, and service in the event of war. The agreement was sealed when the peasant laid his head into the hands of the noble lord.

This ceremony was called a Bondage, as it sealed the bond of the peasant to the noble, as his serf (in contrast with an Homage, where one noble became a vassal of another noble). In our advanced and progressive times, we are – of course – much more evolved and civilized. Far from …


College Is A Bad Investment

To the baby boom generation, a college degree was almost a mystical amulet, and just possessing it meant that your life would be improved in mystical ways. Thus, a college degree was something to be quested for, like a hero from Greek or Norse mythology.

Unfortunately, college is a horrible investment. Actually, I need to amend that; nothing is a horrible investment in-and-of itself. This is true for stocks and bonds, houses, and even college. Overpaying for these things – defined as paying more than is reasonable compared to the returns – makes them bad investments, and if you are attending a four-year college, you are almost certainly overpaying.

The United States has more unemployed college graduates right now than we have ever had before. …